Tartan


full armorial working shhet with chiefs arms and supporters.jpg

IMG_3973
Tartans on display

As a Scottish border Clan and Family who, like all others of that ilk, Carruthers never had a tartan of their own. In fact family tartans rather than regional/district tartans or military tartans only came into being in the early part of the 18th century and only after the visit of King George IV in 1822. This induced the Scottish culture and all that went with it, to become in vogue.

However, as borderers, our clothing was historically far more suited to riding and reiving than wearing a tartan kilt and although a district weave may have been used in some forms of attire, it definitely did not lead to the wearing of the kilt. As times changed and Scots and those descended from the same wished to celebrate their culture by wearing their ‘national dress’, kilts and in some cases trews in the tartan of one’s own clan or family can be often seen at cultural events as well as celebrations such as weddings.

440px-Carruthers_Dress_Tartan
Carruthers

As tartan has become ever more popular and synonymous with Scottish culture and heritage, it has become a defined visual signature associated with a specific clan or family. Because Carruthers never had tartan of their own listed, two tartans were registered with the Scottish Register of Tartans in 2017 by Dr George Carruthers of Fife, an armiger of the clan.  One, the red (STR 11700), he gifted to the Clan Chief on his confirmation and through him the clan.  This was then formally adopted by the Chief leading to a change in the categorisation of its registration, which in turn reflected its status as the official Clan/family tartan of Carruthers.

The Tartan carries the following restrictions: Recognised by the Clan Chief, Dr Simon Peter Carruthers of Holmains, Chief of The Name & Arms of Carruthers and is intended for members of Clan Carruthers & other spellings of the Name. The other, the blue, was kept as a private tartan for Dr Carruthers’ own family.

It was designed for us, taking into account our Border history, by a renowned Scottish tartan designer Mr Brian Wilton MBE and is woven from 100% wool by our Scottish weavers, House of Edgar in Scotland.

This ensures that Carruthers, as a Scottish clan and family is anchored firmly to Scotland and retains its own visual identity and individuality rather than using the tartan of another clan or family.

Carruthers Tartan itself was designed to offer a visual story of our family, depicting just who and what we are.

THE CARRUTHERS TARTAN DESIGN AND ITS MEANINGS

  1. The threadcount and sett mirrors in part that of Bruce. This is in recognition of the years we were viewed as a sept of that Noble house.
    2. The green, purple and lilac in the tartan, represents the lands of our family’s origins in Annandale, Dumfriesshire, South West Scotland.
    3. The reds, represents the blood we spilt throughout history for our country, our lands and our family at home and abroad.
    4. Finally, but no less important, the subtle white stripe is in recognition of our family’s support as Jacobites for the Royal House of Stuart.

It is therefore with the full consent and agreement of the Chief that the Carruthers Red (STR 11700) is the official Clan Carruthers tartan. Although all kiltmakers can make you a kilt or trews to order, they would have to order stock in.


However the tartan is available to all of our name and derivations of the same from our stockists:-

CANADA/USA:  McPhails Kiltmakers, 

103-1475 Fairview Road, Penticton, British Columbia, V2A7W5, Canada.

Phone: 250-462-2998  Email: mcphailkilts@hotmail.com
SCOTLAND:  Anderson Kilts
5 Church Crescent, Dumfries, Dumfries and Galloway, DG1 1DF, Scotland.
Phone: 01387 250250 Email: info@andersonkilts.co.uk
Both businesses are very well known and family run. They manufacture to a high standard  and buy directly from our weavers, the House of Edgar, in Scotland  and importantly supply internationally, at good rates. 

Clan Carruthers Society WP footnote grey 3

www.clancarrutherssociety.org

 

error: Content is protected !!
%d bloggers like this: